A common refrain at my house, from my wife, is “no more ordering.”  I order stuff a lot from Amazon, for roughly the same price they cost in North America, though they never have the crazy sales Amazon.com sometimes have.  But thanks to Amazon, any country Amazon exists in, you can get good comics for American domestic prices.  It’s really awesome.
My purchases since August (keep in mind, my birthday was in August, so I splurged a little): -The book that arrived today, Boxers & Saints.  Never heard of this artist, but it looks ambitious and recommended.  -Uncle Scrooge.  Carl Barks is awesome. -the complete Calvin and Hobbes.  Pure love for this, but I’ve had a hard time getting through it and am still on the first book.  I love it, but I read it daily for ten years, so it’s too much at once.  My daughter will hopefully thank me. -Dash Shaw’s New School.  An awesome, new comic.  He’s on Tumblr, so search him out.  This book really really affected me, in a creative way.  The approach is simply different. -Jim Rugg’s Supermag.  Rugg is also on Tumblr, so search him out too.  Graphically exciting, technically exquisite.  I have never seen a longer piece by him.  This is mainly a collection of 1-4 page pieces, like reading a comic book made of Tumblr. -Attack on Titan.  I ordered the first one after reading about it in a bunch of places, and I liked it, and ordered the next four, and another is in my Amazon shopping cart.  There are things I definitely dislike (like the Titans look like racial caricatures, the artist places word balloons in awkward places), but there are things I love (it is genuine horror, seeing the Titans eat.  Like a Goya painting.  The art is sketchy, in a way little manga is.  I find a lot of manga sterile, and this isn’t at all.) -John Byrne’s X-Men run.  It was something I read and reread as a kid.  The writing is verbose, but it is in many ways the standard of good superhero comics to me.  I think Neal Adams was a better artist, but Byrne in the 80’s was a lot more fun. -Yoshihiro Tatsumi’s Fallen Words.  I definitely liked A Drifting Life better, but there was some charm in this book.  The art is great, but the resolution of the stories weren’t as weighty as I might have wanted.  I’ve read a number of Japanese folk stories, and they are hit and miss, like all things. -Raina Telgemeier’s Drama and Smile.  I wanted to see what the current recommended crop of youth comics were like… I ordered three Bone books too, also from Scholastic.  I liked Smile much better than Drama, since Smile was autobiographical, it was also self-depreciating.  The lead character in Drama was basically a perfect kid; neurotic, but all her mistakes were done with the best of intentions.  I’d rather see a character with room to grow and change.  That’s a personal preference though.  I was overall impressed by the books, and they seem important in broadening the content of American comics.  Who would’ve thought Scholastic would become a relevant comics publisher?
I have more comics ordered (Frank Santoro’s Pompei and Seth’s Palookaville #21 <which I ordered last November, D&Q totally screwed up the solicitation on that one>) and more in the cart (Battling Boy, I want to see what Paul Pope does now, and Attack on Titan 6, but I may just Google search the story if they don’t get to Eren’s basement soon… A major problem with manga is the wheel spinning to sell weekly mags and collections.  It gets boring.).
That’s all for now.  I want to write about comics more, hopefully this wasn’t too wordy.

A common refrain at my house, from my wife, is “no more ordering.”  I order stuff a lot from Amazon, for roughly the same price they cost in North America, though they never have the crazy sales Amazon.com sometimes have.  But thanks to Amazon, any country Amazon exists in, you can get good comics for American domestic prices.  It’s really awesome.

My purchases since August (keep in mind, my birthday was in August, so I splurged a little): -The book that arrived today, Boxers & Saints.  Never heard of this artist, but it looks ambitious and recommended.  -Uncle Scrooge.  Carl Barks is awesome. -the complete Calvin and Hobbes.  Pure love for this, but I’ve had a hard time getting through it and am still on the first book.  I love it, but I read it daily for ten years, so it’s too much at once.  My daughter will hopefully thank me. -Dash Shaw’s New School.  An awesome, new comic.  He’s on Tumblr, so search him out.  This book really really affected me, in a creative way.  The approach is simply different. -Jim Rugg’s Supermag.  Rugg is also on Tumblr, so search him out too.  Graphically exciting, technically exquisite.  I have never seen a longer piece by him.  This is mainly a collection of 1-4 page pieces, like reading a comic book made of Tumblr. -Attack on Titan.  I ordered the first one after reading about it in a bunch of places, and I liked it, and ordered the next four, and another is in my Amazon shopping cart.  There are things I definitely dislike (like the Titans look like racial caricatures, the artist places word balloons in awkward places), but there are things I love (it is genuine horror, seeing the Titans eat.  Like a Goya painting.  The art is sketchy, in a way little manga is.  I find a lot of manga sterile, and this isn’t at all.) -John Byrne’s X-Men run.  It was something I read and reread as a kid.  The writing is verbose, but it is in many ways the standard of good superhero comics to me.  I think Neal Adams was a better artist, but Byrne in the 80’s was a lot more fun. -Yoshihiro Tatsumi’s Fallen Words.  I definitely liked A Drifting Life better, but there was some charm in this book.  The art is great, but the resolution of the stories weren’t as weighty as I might have wanted.  I’ve read a number of Japanese folk stories, and they are hit and miss, like all things. -Raina Telgemeier’s Drama and Smile.  I wanted to see what the current recommended crop of youth comics were like… I ordered three Bone books too, also from Scholastic.  I liked Smile much better than Drama, since Smile was autobiographical, it was also self-depreciating.  The lead character in Drama was basically a perfect kid; neurotic, but all her mistakes were done with the best of intentions.  I’d rather see a character with room to grow and change.  That’s a personal preference though.  I was overall impressed by the books, and they seem important in broadening the content of American comics.  Who would’ve thought Scholastic would become a relevant comics publisher?

I have more comics ordered (Frank Santoro’s Pompei and Seth’s Palookaville #21 <which I ordered last November, D&Q totally screwed up the solicitation on that one>) and more in the cart (Battling Boy, I want to see what Paul Pope does now, and Attack on Titan 6, but I may just Google search the story if they don’t get to Eren’s basement soon… A major problem with manga is the wheel spinning to sell weekly mags and collections.  It gets boring.).

That’s all for now.  I want to write about comics more, hopefully this wasn’t too wordy.